An Analysts Workstation

Six months ago we published An Analyst’s Environment, which describes some tools we use that are a bit beyond the typical lone gun grassroots analyst. Since then our VPS based Elasticsearch cluster has given way to some Xeon equipment in racks, which lead to Xeon equipment under desks.

Looking back over the past two months, we see a quickly maturing “build sheet” for analyst workstations. This is in no small part due to our discovery of Budgie, an Ubuntu Linux offshoot. Some of our best qualitative analysts are on Macs and they are extremely defensive of their work environment. Budgie permits at least some of that activity to move to Linux, and its thought that this will become increasingly common.

Do not assume that “I already use Ubuntu” is sufficient to evaluate Budgie. They are spending a lot of time taking off the rough edges. At the very least, put it in a VM and give it a look.

Once installed, we’re including the following packages by default:

  • Secure communications are best handled with Wire.
  • The Hunch.ly web capture package requires Google Chrome.
  • Chromium provides a separate unrecorded browser.
  • Maltego CE link analysis package is useful even if constrained.
  • Evernote is popular with some of our people, Tusk works on Linux.
  • XMind Zen provides mind mapping that works on all platforms.
  • Timeline has been a long term player and keeps adding features.
  • Gephi data visualization works, no matter what sized screen is used.

Both Talkwalker Alerts and Inoreader feeds are RSS based. People seem to be happy with the web interface, but what happens when you’re in a place without network access. There are a number of RSS related applications in Budgie’s slick software store. Someone is going to have to go through them and see which best fits that particular use case.

Budgie’s many packages for handling RSS feeds.

There have been so many iterations of this set of recommendations, most conditioned by the desire to support Windows, as well as Mac and Linux. The proliferation of older Xeon equipment, in particular the second generation HP Z420/Z620/Z820, which start in useable condition at around $150, mean we no longer have that constraint.

Sampling of inexpensive HP Z420s on Ebay in May of 2019.

Starting with that base, 64 gig of additional memory is about $150, and another $200 will will cover a 500 gig Crucial solid state disk and the fanless entry level Nvidia GT1030.

The specific combination of the Z420 and the Xeon E5-2650L v2 has a benchmark that matches the current MacBook Pro, it will be literally an order of magnitude faster on Gephi, the most demanding of those applications, and it will happily work for hours on end without making a sound. The Mac, on the other hand, will be making about as much noise as a Shopvac after just five minutes.

That chip and some Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut should not cost you more than $60 and will take a base Z420 from four cores to ten. So there you have it – mostly free software, a workstation you can build incrementally, and then you have the foundation required to sort out complex problems.