A Deadpool Of Bots

Yesterday in chat someone pointed out a small set of accounts that followed this Dirty Dozen of known harassment artists.

Dirty Dozen De Jure
Dirty Dozen De Jure

The accounts all had the format <first name><last name><two digits>. We extracted two dozen from the followers of these twelve accounts, then ran their followers and found a total of 112 accessible accounts that had this same format. Suspecting a botnet, we created a mention map to see how they have been spending their time.

112 Bots & Mentions
112 Bots & Mentions

This image is immediately telling for those used to examining mention maps. There are too many communities (denoted by different colors) present for such a small group and the isolated or nearly isolated islands just don’t look like a human interaction pattern.

ICObench Nexus
ICObench Nexus

Adjusting from outbound degree to Eigenvector centrality, it was immediately clear what the focus of this group of accounts was. The next level of zoom in the names revealed two other cryptocurency news sites and a leader in the field as being the targets of the these accounts.

Thinking that 112 was a small number, we extracted their 7,029 unique followers’ IDs and got their names. Nearly 600 matched the first/last/digits format, but there were other similarities as well. We placed all 7,029 in our “slow cooker”, set to capture all of their tweets.

6,897 Bots
6,897 Bots

We were expecting to find signs of a botnet, but it appears the entire set of accounts are part of the same effort. The 6,897 we managed to collect were all created in the same twelve week period. The gap between creation times and the steady production of about eighty accounts per day seems to indicate a small hand run operation in a country with cheap labor.

Hashtags Used
Hashtags Used

The network is transparently focused on cryptocurrency over the long haul. Adjusting the timeframe to the last thirty days moved the keywords around a bit but the word cloud is largely the same. The clue to how these accounts got into the mix is there in the lower right quadrant Р#followme and #followback indicate a willingness to engage whomever from the world at large, in addition to their siblings.

Why we have pursued this so far when it looks like just a cryptocurrency botnet is due to this clue.

The Big Clue
The Big Clue

Here are five bad actors with two other accounts created right in between them time wise. This is the most striking example, but there are others like it. And understand the HUMINT that triggered this – a group of people who do nothing but take down racist hate talkers all day feel besieged by a group that manages to immediately regenerate after losing an account.

Our Working Theory

What we think we are seeing here is a pool of low end crypto pump and dump accounts that were either created for or later sold to a ringleader in this radicalized right wing group.

Now that we have roughly 7,000 of them on record, we have to decide what to do. This is just such a blatant example of automation that Twitter might immediately take it down if they notice. The 6.5 million tweets we collected are utterly dull – the prize here is the user profile dataset. We’d need some mods to our software, but maybe we need to collect all the followers for this group of 7,000 and figure out what the actual boundaries of this botnet truly are.

This has been a tiresome encounter for those who make it their business to drive hate speech from Twitter, but this may be the light at the end of the tunnel. If one group is using pools of purchased accounts to put their foot soldiers back in play the minute they get suspended, others are doing this, too. No effort was made to conceal this one from even moderate analysis efforts. If we demonstrate this is a pattern and Twitter is forced to act, we may well find that a lot of the heat will go out of political discourse on that platform.